Inside 736-131

Existential Pontification and Generalized Abstract Digressions


What is Stateless User Interface?

The essence of stateless user interface is that actions you take with a program should not depend on implicit state. Stateless interfaces are easier to understand, because an invocation of a command with some arguments will always do the same thing, whereas in a stateful interface, the command may do some different than it did […]

  • November 27, 2015

Is no-reinstall Cabal coming to GHC 8.0?

You might be wondering: with the beta release of no-reinstall Cabal, is this functionality be coming to GHC 8.0? (Or even a new release of Cabal, since the no-reinstall feature works with GHC 7.10). Unfortunately, there is a split among the Cabal developers over whether or not the actual no-reinstall behavior should go into Cabal […]

  • September 18, 2015

Help us beta test “no-reinstall Cabal”

Over this summer, Vishal Agrawal has been working on a GSoC project to move Cabal to more Nix-like package management system. More simply, he is working to make it so that you'll never get one of these errors from cabal-install again: Resolving dependencies... In order, the following would be installed: directory- (reinstall) changes: time-1.4.2 -> […]

  • August 29, 2015

Width-adaptive XMonad layout

My usual laptop setup is I have a wide monitor, and then I use my laptop screen as a secondary monitor. For a long time, I had two XMonad layouts: one full screen layout for my laptop monitor (I use big fonts to go easy on the eyes) and a two-column layout when I'm on […]

  • May 2, 2015

Haskell Implementor’s Workshop ’14

This year at ICFP, we had some blockbuster attendance to the Haskell Implementor's Workshop (at times, it was standing room only). I had the pleasure of presenting the work I had done over the summer on Backpack. You can grab the slides or view the presentation itself (thank you ICFP organizers for being incredibly on-the-ball […]

  • September 7, 2014

Open type families are not modular

One of the major open problems for building a module system in Haskell is the treatment of type classes, which I have discussed previously on this blog. I've noted how the current mode of use in type classes in Haskell assume “global uniqueness”, which is inherently anti-modular; breaking this assumption risks violating the encapsulation of […]

  • September 4, 2014

A taste of Cabalized Backpack

So perhaps you've bought into modules and modularity and want to get to using Backpack straightaway. How can you do it? In this blog post, I want to give a tutorial-style taste of how to program Cabal in the Backpack style. None of these examples are executable, because only some of this system is in […]

  • August 26, 2014

What’s a module system good for anyway?

This summer, I've been working at Microsoft Research implementing Backpack, a module system for Haskell. Interestingly, Backpack is not really a single monolothic feature, but, rather, an agglomeration of small, infrastructural changes which combine together in an interesting way. In this series of blog posts, I want to talk about what these individual features are, […]

  • August 9, 2014

Type classes: confluence, coherence and global uniqueness

Today, I'd like to talk about some of the core design principles behind type classes, a wildly successful feature in Haskell. The discussion here is closely motivated by the work we are doing at MSRC to support type classes in Backpack. While I was doing background reading, I was flummoxed to discover widespread misuse of […]

  • July 11, 2014

Parsec: “try a <|> b” considered harmful

tl;dr The scope of backtracking try should be minimized, usually by placing it inside the definition of a parser. Have you ever written a Parsec parser and gotten a really uninformative error message? "test.txt" (line 15, column 7): unexpected 'A' expecting end of input The line and the column are randomly somewhere in your document, […]

  • May 17, 2014