Inside 245-5D

Existential Pontification and Generalized Abstract Digressions

Backpack

Backpack for deep learning

This is a guest post by Kaixi Ruan. Backpack is a module system for Haskell, released recently in GHC 8.2.1. As this is a new feature, I wanted to know how people use it. So I searched Twitter every day, and the other day I saw this tweet: Are there other examples than String/Bytestring/Text? So […]

  • August 17, 2017

Designing the Backpack signature ecosystem

Suppose you are a library writer interested in using Backpack. Backpack says that you can replace a direct dependency on a function, type or package with one or more signatures. You typecheck against a signature and your end user picks how they want to eventually implement the signature. Sounds good right? But there's a dirty […]

  • March 11, 2017

Try Backpack: Cabal packages

This post is part two of a series about how you can try out Backpack, a new mixin package system for Haskell. In the previous post, we described how to use a new ghc --backpack mode in GHC to quickly try out Backpack's new signature features. Unfortunately, there is no way to distribute the input […]

  • January 17, 2017

Backpack and the PVP

In the PVP, you increment the minor version number if you add functions to a module, and the major version number if you remove function to a module. Intuitively, this is because adding functions is a backwards compatible change, while removing functions is a breaking change; to put it more formally, if the new interface […]

  • December 30, 2016

The problem of reusable and composable specifications

It's not too hard to convince people that version bounds are poor approximation for a particular API that we depend on. What do we mean when we say >= 1.0 && < 1.1? A version bound is a proxy some set of modules and functions with some particular semantics that a library needs to be […]

  • December 17, 2016

Thoughts about Spec-ulation (Rich Hickey)

Rich Hickey recently gave a keynote at Clojure/conj 2016, meditating on the problems of versioning, specification and backwards compatibility in language ecosystems. In it, Rich considers the "extremist" view, what if we built a language ecosystem, where you never, ever broke backwards compatibility. A large portion of the talk is spent grappling with the ramifications […]

  • December 16, 2016

Try Backpack: ghc --backpack

Backpack, a new system for mix-in packages in Haskell, has been released with GHC 8.2. Although Backpack is closely integrated with the Cabal package system, it's still possible to play around with toy examples using a new command ghc --backpack. Before you get started, make sure you have a recent enough version of GHC: ezyang@sabre:~$ […]

  • October 10, 2016

The Base of a String Theory for Haskell

One of the early posts from this blog, from 2010, was on the subject of how to pick your string library in Haskell. Half a decade later, the Haskell ecosystem is still largely in the same situation as it was half a decade ago, where most of the boot libraries shipped with GHC (e.g., base) […]

  • September 7, 2016

Backpack and separate compilation

When building a module system which supports parametrizing code over multiple implementations (i.e., functors), you run into an important implementation question: how do you compile said parametric code? In existing language implementations are three major schools of thought: The separate compilation school says that you should compile your functors independently of their implementations. This school […]

  • September 1, 2016

Open type families are not modular

One of the major open problems for building a module system in Haskell is the treatment of type classes, which I have discussed previously on this blog. I've noted how the current mode of use in type classes in Haskell assume “global uniqueness”, which is inherently anti-modular; breaking this assumption risks violating the encapsulation of […]

  • September 4, 2014